dmarc

DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance) is an email authentication protocol. It is designed to give email domain owners the ability to protect their domain from unauthorized use, commonly known as email spoofing. The purpose and primary outcome of implementing DMARC is to protect a domain from being used in business email compromise attacks, phishing emails, email scams and other cyber threat activities.
Once the DMARC DNS entry is published, any receiving email server can authenticate the incoming email based on the instructions published by the domain owner within the DNS entry. If the email passes the authentication it will be delivered and can be trusted. If the email fails the check, depending on the instructions held within the DMARC record the email could be delivered, quarantined or rejected.
DMARC extends two existing mechanisms, Sender Policy Framework (SPF) and DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM). It allows the administrative owner of a domain to publish a policy in their DNS records to specify which mechanism (DKIM, SPF or both) is employed when sending email from that domain; how to check the From: field presented to end users; how the receiver should deal with failures - and a reporting mechanism for actions performed under those policies.
DMARC is defined in RFC 7489, dated March 2015, as "Informational".

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  1. WST16

    Info DMARC adoption report (email servers)

    Interesting chart. I have implemented DMRC on my poor DS118 email service. I can’t understand why a huge company can’t (or won’t) do it! No. 2 on the chart is “have an MX record”! Can one run an email server (service) without an MX record?!
  2. WST16

    SPF, DKIM and DMARC. 2019-04-11

    If you’re a brave soul who’s feeling adventurous and about to embark on setting up your own mail server on your DiskStation, this is a very helpful article that explains SPF, DKIM and DMARC.
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