DS Assistant cant find 1821+

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DS Assistant cant find 1821+

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DS1821+
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  1. Windows
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Hey tehre guys,
I realised now I cant access/find my 1821+ though ds assistant nowadays... Although I disabled firewalls etc...
Any ideas??

If typing the url from browser I can access it..
also finds.synology.com works ok

thank you
Giorgos
 
Can anyone help me regarding this guys?
I also opened up Liughtroom (which used to work decent with catalog localy and images on NAS) but now images wont even begginh to load... like there isnt connection localy...

Any help appreciated please
 
I'm not a Windows user so never bothered with Synology Assistant (which I guess is what you meant by DS assistant). What's it supposed to provide that just knowing the LAN IP name of the NAS doesn't? How did Assistant used to present how it saw the NAS (Server name; IP address).

If you have a reserved LAN IP for the NAS, sometimes called a static/manual IP, then you will know this and can use it to access the NAS. There is a Server Name that is assigned in Control Panel / Network / General. I think that this is probably what Windows networking will use to access the NAS... have you changed this?

And does Lightroom have cached credentials for the NAS? It does sound like both Assistant and Lightroom not finding the NAS as the same problem.

Yes, it could be that the NAS isn't been seen as part of the same LAN segment. Have you either implemented VLANs or changed the LAN subnet mask?
 
Do you have vlans? is this wireless vs wired? Can you reach and ping the port that DSM is set to ( default 5000,5001 ). Can you post a screenshot of find.synology
connections are wired, where do I check for vlans? I think I dont have any. I attach pictures. (now I was playing with ethernet ports at NAS side and suddenly it has the ip 192.168.1.36 rather than 192.168.1.3 that it used to be assigned, but the DSM system says its still connected to 192.168.1.3)



Also @fredbert how can I give cached credentials to Lightroom?



thanks a lot guys and help appreciated
 

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connections are wired, where do I check for vlans?
Your router (and in some cases a smart L2 or L3 switch) manages your VLANs a IP addresses.

In most consumer grade routers, the router is set up with DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) which automatically assigns IP to all devices connected to it. The router has a timer in it that will automatically renew the "DHCP Lease Time" if a devices is still connected. But it a devices has been turned off (typically for more than 24 hours), your router's DHCP may assign a different IP address the next time a device is turned on.

In this respect, the IP address for your NAS can change. However, most devices can be set to have a "static" IP. Your NAS can be set to either accept the router's DHCP IP or set with a "static" IP. When a device (like your NAS or PC) are set to a static IP, your router will use the device's "static" IP to establish routing communications between other devices so long as the "static" IP addresses are NOT part of the range assigned to be DHCP by your router.

So, try this....
Launch a browser on your PC that is connected to your LAN with WiFi or Ethernet wire. Type "finds.synology.com". Look at the screen that comes up and note the IP address that is reported for your NAS.

Then, on your Windows PC, go to Settings > Network & internet > Wi Fi (or Ethernet) > Properties. This page will show you what IP address has been assigned to your PC.

The first 2 numbers sets will be the same (eg. 192.168.XXX.YYY). The last set of numbers will be different than your NAS (YYY). The XXX number is called your sub-net. If both your NAS and PC are on the same sub-net, then your PC can be said to be on the same LAN sub-net as your NAS.

If your PC and NAS are on the same LAN sub-net and Syno Assistant still can't find your NAS, chances are very likely that your PC Firewall is blocking Syno Assistant.

To check if your PC is blocking Syno Assistant, do this... Go to Control Panel > System & Security > Windows defender firewall > Allowed apps. This page will allow you to determine if your PC firewall is blocking Syno Assistant. And you can also change the Windows defender firewall status for each windows apps.
 
Also @fredbert how can I give cached credentials to Lightroom?
I suspect Lightroom caches the connection and login credentials, or somehow stores them securely.

From the screenshots I wonder if you have connected a second Ethernet cable to the NAS. If you have then you can also set the interface priority in Control Panel’s Network settings. Though I doubt this has anything to do with your problem.
 
Your router (and in some cases a smart L2 or L3 switch) manages your VLANs a IP addresses.

In most consumer grade routers, the router is set up with DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) which automatically assigns IP to all devices connected to it. The router has a timer in it that will automatically renew the "DHCP Lease Time" if a devices is still connected. But it a devices has been turned off (typically for more than 24 hours), your router's DHCP may assign a different IP address the next time a device is turned on.

In this respect, the IP address for your NAS can change. However, most devices can be set to have a "static" IP. Your NAS can be set to either accept the router's DHCP IP or set with a "static" IP. When a device (like your NAS or PC) are set to a static IP, your router will use the device's "static" IP to establish routing communications between other devices so long as the "static" IP addresses are NOT part of the range assigned to be DHCP by your router.

So, try this....
Launch a browser on your PC that is connected to your LAN with WiFi or Ethernet wire. Type "finds.synology.com". Look at the screen that comes up and note the IP address that is reported for your NAS.

Then, on your Windows PC, go to Settings > Network & internet > Wi Fi (or Ethernet) > Properties. This page will show you what IP address has been assigned to your PC.

The first 2 numbers sets will be the same (eg. 192.168.XXX.YYY). The last set of numbers will be different than your NAS (YYY). The XXX number is called your sub-net. If both your NAS and PC are on the same sub-net, then your PC can be said to be on the same LAN sub-net as your NAS.

If your PC and NAS are on the same LAN sub-net and Syno Assistant still can't find your NAS, chances are very likely that your PC Firewall is blocking Syno Assistant.

To check if your PC is blocking Syno Assistant, do this... Go to Control Panel > System & Security > Windows defender firewall > Allowed apps. This page will allow you to determine if your PC firewall is blocking Syno Assistant. And you can also change the Windows defender firewall status for each windows apps.
Thanks a lot for your easy to understand suggestion, well the IP my desktop gets is managednbybdhcpnalso and it usually is 192.168.1.2

I was playing with lease time before your post and yes I can manage get usually 192.168.1.3 for my NAS.

I have closed all firewalls and also enabled ds assistant program already. Without changing anything, lightroom seemed to work properly yesterday and loading photos ok.

Thing is ds assistant can't see the router. SMB connection works fine as I am able to "instantly" copy 30-40Mbyte file transfers to desktop.

Only "fault" is that 192.168.1.3 is part o the DHCP range, if I remember correct, DHCP IP range on my router started from 192.168.1.2... Should I use an IP for my NAS outside of dhcp range of my router?


Thank you
-- post merged: --

@fredbert I think lightroom works ok mate, thanks a lot though, if anything changes will inform you
 
Most routers that perform DHCP will also allow you to reserve an IP address for a specific MAC address. So even if 192.168.1.3 is in the DHCP assignable subnet you can still reserve it to be only given to the NAS's LAN port (each LAN port will have its own unique MAC address).

Maybe the reason Lightroom still works (I thought you had said it also stopped working) is because you used the Windows networking name for the NAS, e.g. My_NAS, rather than 192.168.1.3?

The DHCP lease time has been tricky for me in the past: my HP printer kept dropping when I had a longer than 10800s time. Using whatever was the default in the DHCP service solved that for me.
 
Most routers that perform DHCP will also allow you to reserve an IP address for a specific MAC address.
@frebert is right. This is a 3rd way of managing IP addresses on your LAN. BUT, there is a BIG gatcha if you are not careful. Let me explain...

Summary - 3 ways to have IP addresses assigned on your LAN (excluding L3 switches for this post):
  1. Assign a "Static" IP address on your devices connected to your router.
  2. Allow your router to "automatically" assign IPs on devices with router DHCP services (default setup).
  3. "Reserve" DHCP assignment of a specific IP by your router as @frebert described.
Most ISP routers don't give the user the ability to "Reserve" IP addresses. And most 3rd party routers are initially setup with the entire primary subnet as "Automatic" DHCP IP assignment (default).

There is one more piece of information you need to understand how the router handles IPs. Routers that allow you to "Reserve" IP assignments also allow (REQUIRE) you to declare what range of IPs will be for "Automatic" and which ones will be "Reserve" or "Static". For example, 192.168.1.2 through 192.168.1.150 could be configured as DHCP "Automatic" assignment. All the other IPs on the subnet could be used for "Reserve" or "Static" IPs. You can't mix up these without problems.

Example:
  1. If a device that has a "Static" IP is connected to a router AND the "Static" IP happens to be INSIDE the router's "Automatic" assignment IP range => PROBLEM.
  2. If a device that has a "Static" IP is connected to a router AND the "Static" IP is OUTSIDE the router's "Automatic" assignment IP range => GOOD.
  3. If a router is configured with a "Reserve" DHCP assignment of a specific IP that happens to be INSIDE the router's "Automatic" assignment IP range => PROBLEM.
  4. If a router is configured with a "Reserve" DHCP assignment of a specific IP that IS OUTSIDE the router's "Automatic" assignment IP range => GOOD
More than one person (me included) have fallen victim to improper router/device IP configuration.

The moral to this story is: Be sure you know how your router DHCP configuration is setup IF you have ANY devices with "Static" IP or "Reserve" IP assignment. If you don't, you will inevitably experience weird and unanticipated issues.

So, check your router to see how your DHCP range is configured. Then make sure your "Static" IP devices are in the proper range. Same goes for router DHCP "Reserve" IP assignments.
 
I have used DHCP binding on my router and I have put 192.168.1.2 for my desktop and 192.168.1.3 for my NAS (is this ok regarding the ranges you were saying mate?)

also here are the settings of DHCP

1.JPG

2.jpg

3.jpg





thanks a lot
Giorgos
 
Your DHCP range should exclude your reserved IPs. For example, DHCP range 192.168.1.2 to 192.168.1.49 ... And assigned/reserved/fixed IP addresses are xxx.xxx.xxx.050 and up.

Preferably set/manage reserved IPs through your router, not through client devices.
 
Usually the DHCP IP range can be part of the subnet, and this is what is used by the DHCP service to assign dynamically. However, you can also reserve IP addresses and these can be inside or outside of that range: when a device with MAC address that has a IP reservation requests network info then this reserved IP will be given. When you have a reservation the associated client device can now either use DHCP to configure its network settings, or you can just manually enter them. What is important is that the reserved IP address will not be given to another device.

The cut-off screenshot looks to have a section called DHCP Binding which is probably where you make these IP address / MAC address reservations.
 
I used the dhcp binding to reserve the ip address which is inside dhcp auto binding range, is this ok? I am a bit confused to be honest mate but thanks for the help
 
it has lease time infinity to it and to my desktop's ip and I think it wont give them to other device if I am not mistaken right?
 
Check the DHCP lease time, as I said earlier, reverting back to the DHCP server's default lease time fixed a problem for me.
The DHCP lease time has been tricky for me in the past: my HP printer kept dropping when I had a longer than 10800s time. Using whatever was the default in the DHCP service solved that for me.

My personal approach is to have a small range of IP addresses in the LAN subnet that are dynamically assigned (e.g. ...200 to ...250). The IP reservations are below this where I use ...2 to ...99 for wired clients and ...100 to ...199 for wireless clients. And if a device has both wired and wireless interfaces I then reserve ...nn and ...1nn. I like to then group device types in IP ranges, such as: network devices up to ...9; NAS and servers ...10 to ...19; desktops; laptops; phones; etc. etc.

However, you can have the DHCP dynamic range as ...2 to ...254 if you really want, and still reserve IP addresses in this range. It does work but you have to be sure that the reservations have been made.

The DHCP server can still send the reserved IP addresses to clients configured to use DHCP requests. Or if you like, manually configure the client with the reserved IP address etc.
 
I don't know where to reserve just IP addresses, only found DHCP binding... Well even with normal lease time then as wasn't visible on ds assistant... Will focus more to make the connection secure I think because now www.mydomain.com seems unsecure to the website I host although I have lets.encrypt certificates... Hmm ..
 
What router do you have? Maybe I can find the Help/manual for it.

Also, could you show a screenshot of the DHCP Binding section? I think that sounds like where you would make IP address reservations, though it could be for DHCP relay.

In your DHCP Server screenshot you have dynamic IP address assignment on a 60 seconds (1 minute) lease. Is that really necessary? Usually it would be a day, or three/four hours.
 

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