DS923+/DS918+ replacement power supply charger

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DS923+/DS918+ replacement power supply charger

Bought this power supply charger on Amazon as a spare in case the original Synology one would die at some point.

Bought it because the advertised specs matched the original Synology power supply charger specs which are:

AC input: 100-240V∼2.0A, 50-60Hz
DC output: 12V-8.33V

syno_orig_psc.jpg

Original Synology power supply charger specs.

Upon receiving the replacement adapter the specs on the adapter were the following:

AC input: 100-240V∼50-60Hz 1.8A Max
DC output: 12V-8.33V 100W

kfd_psc.jpg

Replacement power supply charger specs. Note that input current is 1.8A Max whereas it's 2.0A on the original Synology power supply charger.

Clearly, there was an input current discrepancy of 0.2A between advertised and actual input current.

Tried powering both DS918+ and DS923+ with replacement power supply charger and none of the Synology units was complaining but I am worried that 0.2A current discrepancy might cause issues at higher consumption (e.g. RAID repair on all 4 drives and/or running a VM).

Question: Shall I return the replacement power supply charger and just buy the highly overpriced original Synology power supply charger as a spare to be on the safe side/avoid any damage to Synology?
 
Should be good... Output voltage and current is the one that's important... Input current may differ based on design differencesi in both supply's circuitry.....
I did the same on my 720+'s and 718+.... Bought an Ebay supply and placed it in service immediately... So I have a spare Synology supply on the shelf, "In Case"
 
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Should be good... Output voltage and current is the one that's important... Input current may differ based on design of both supply's circuitry.....
I did the same on my 720+'s and 718+.... Bought an Ebay supply and placed it in service immediately... So I have a spare Synology supply on the shelf, "In Case"
@Jan Janowski - thanks for sharing your experience, glad to hear I can expect stable operation of Synology unit; fingers crossed I'll never have to use it but I feel better knowing I have a working spare that shouldn't cause any malfunction. 👍
 
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I'm not the electrical graduate at home, but I'd be inclined to think it should be ok. What it's supplying to the NAS is what's required.

I just looked at my official Synology power brick for my DS1520+ and it has:
Input: 100-240V, 2.0A
Output: 12V, 10A

So I have the same input as your DS918+'s power brick but supplying more current.
 
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No EE here either, but 48 years. multiple TV Networks permitted me to do component level repairs on their gear! The eBay supply bought for 720+/718+ has greater current handling than stock Synology supply, too!

Output voltage is critical. Output current has to meet or exceed stock supply current.

The one spec that no one talks about: Depending on how much accounting dept. was contacted during the power supply design….A 5 year old power supply may only give 70% of its rated current it gave when new. Everything is designed with cost in matter, So, an overrated supply is not a bad thing.

I have rebuilt many product’s supplies, upgrading caps sizes and voltage, with Low ESR Caps. But that’s a conversation for another time….
 
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The eBay supply bought for 720+/718+ has greater current handling than stock Synology supply, too!

Output voltage is critical. Output current has to meet or exceed stock supply current.
@Jan Janowski - great to hear that! But in my case, replacement power supply charger has lower input current handling? What limitation does max. input current of 1.8A versus 2.0A impose on the power supply charger?
 
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Hi everyone, not been on here for a while. Just had a similar thing happen to me. I started my NAS journey wih a DS415+ (bought 2014/10/21) which died after a few years, however I kept it to see if I could resurrect it. Then bought a DS918+ (2018/07/18). I noticed the other day, my DS918+ was not working, looked today and the power supply was kaput.
Power supply specs for DS918+ are
Model: 11011D-120
AC IN: 100-240V-2.0A, 50-60 Hz
Out: 12V--8.33A
Power supply specs for DS415+ are
Model: 110-1E-120
AC IN: 100-240V-2.5A, 50-60 Hz
Out: 12V--8.33A
So input a little different, but output the same. Seems to be working fine, any comments on long term usage issues would be appreciated.
Is it a good idea to have a spare power supply? If so I'll get the correct one.
Thanks in advance
 
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Have 3x NAS’s. 2x720+ 1x718+.
All use same external supply.
When last NAS was bought, I bought an EBay supply with higher current specs. After a month, (to cover ‘infant mortality’), I swapped to eBay supply on NAS, and the Synology supply is now a tested, spare on the shelf.

In case of a problem...... With spare supply on shelf, you know nearly immediately if it was power supply, or 'something else'.. With all power supplies degrading over time in service (Do to electrolytic capacitors drying out --- less so sitting on a shelf) this is a worthwhile investment, especially so if it's a model where many posts about this type of failure exists..... OR EVEN MORE IMPORTANT if you have multiple units with same supply, or fully loaded. If Greater Current level supplies ARE AVAILABLE, it would benefit purchasing one with greater current specs....

One last comment on getting supply with increased Current Specs:
When your NAS was designed, drives were smaller - used less power than larger ones now.. Who Knows how much power supply "Headroom" Synology designed in to the unit.. for fullly loaded NAS with larger Drives.... As Larger drives are developed, and as all drive sleds are filled over time, they require more current... at the same time the power supply is decreasing in current capability..

That's why supplies suddenly fail... Therefore, it makes sense considering a 30% loss of current capability over 5 years to have a supply with greater 'Headroom"!!





Now: if you are into repairing to the component level.... Here is rules I've followed:
First... Let it sit for 10 min without power... You can be zapped! ALL TESTING done without power.
You need an ESR meter to measure caps in circuit... to determine if a cap needs to be replaced, other than the obvious leaking or swollen caps, that scream: "Replace Me!".
Use ONLY Low ESR 105 degree C rated replacement Caps -- Even if caps removed were un-labeled or 85 Degree C units..
If you find exploded or burned devices: Stop.. Pitch supply and buy new one... That is above your pay grade!

Primary side of switching supplies.... Use same caps if replacement is needed. Primary side large filter caps (50/60Hz) is usually not the issue, but smaller "start-up" caps when dry can prevent a switching supply from starting at all, even when they 'look' good: (Why you need an ESR meter).
Secondary side of switching supplies.... Usually has two sets of caps, per supply: one closest to transformer, one after an inductor....
On Secondary side (If space permits) on caps closest to transformer, increase voltage range one step... If you find 15V, replace with 25V, and increase cap size by +30% or more: If you find 1000uf, replace with 1500uf... If space allows, (it may not)... The caps closest to the transformer will be most likely to dry out.. $.02

(I’ve got broadcast video gear built in the 1990’s with repaired power supplies, still running here!)
 
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