I want to locate a computer a long physical distance from its keyboard and monitor. Does a LAN peripheral extention exist?

Currently reading
I want to locate a computer a long physical distance from its keyboard and monitor. Does a LAN peripheral extention exist?

484
97
NAS
DS220+, DS918+, RS1219+
Operating system
  1. Windows
Mobile operating system
  1. Android
So I'm playing around with setting up a tower computer as a docker server. My issue is that I want to locate the computer itself in my basement when my UPC is, but have the monitor and keyboard upstairs in my office. I don't want to VPN into the computer downstairs with my regular office computer because that computer is frequently bogged down running engineering simulations. So here's the question: is there any device that'd allow me to view & control the downstairs computer via a cat6 line connected to my LAN? I'm thinking of a little network box that lets me plug in a keyboard, mouse, and monitor. I don't know if such a device exists or what it'd be called.
 
Solution
It’s called a KVM extender. However, the Cat 6 cable is point to point and doesn't go through a switch. You'll have to run the cable to your basement. So not a LAN solution per se, but an “extender”.

Many options. Here's one on Amazon.

Compare with the other options offered. Only buy if you can return. Some of them can be finicky.
It’s called a KVM extender. However, the Cat 6 cable is point to point and doesn't go through a switch. You'll have to run the cable to your basement. So not a LAN solution per se, but an “extender”.

Many options. Here's one on Amazon.

Compare with the other options offered. Only buy if you can return. Some of them can be finicky.
 
Upvote 0
Solution
You could try TinyPilot which is a genuine KVM over IP option. It is open source, you can self-build one using a Raspberry Pi or take the easy option and buy a Tiny Pilot that is plug-in-and-go:

TinyPilot KVM over IP.png


I'm not user of the above as I just remote in to a headless Mac mini and run everything I need to from there; but it looks pretty cool for a small setup without the large price of a enterprise-grade KVM-over-IP solution.

Video here:

To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.
 
Upvote 0
You could try TinyPilot which is a genuine KVM over IP option. It is open source, you can self-build one using a Raspberry Pi or take the easy option and buy a Tiny Pilot that is plug-in-and-go:

View attachment 3049

I'm not user of the above as I just remote in to a headless Mac mini and run everything I need to from there; but it looks pretty cool for a small setup without the large price of a enterprise-grade KVM-over-IP solution.

Video here:

To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.

That's also really cool, but don't I again need a 2nd pc to run the web browser for the remote-access capability? For simplicity sake, lets just say that the only thing I'm going to have in my office to access the basement computer is a monitor, keyboard, and mouse, plus whatever kvm-extension hardware I need to buy. The tinypilot looks like I'd need a 2nd computer to run a web browser to view the remote computer?
 
Upvote 0
Understood but the advantage of getting the KVM on your network is that you can access your main machine from anywhere and without taking extra cpu cycles from the main PC.

If you are maxing-out your basement machine then buying a seriously cheap mini PC for your existing study monitor & peripherals (say 1 litre size - I like the Lenovo m720q for around £300 on eBay) will give you the ability to continue working whilst your main machine is doing the heavy lifting.

It's pretty much the way I work - I set a task and trigger a remote machine to do the hard (and noisy) work, leaving my laptop free to do the light duty stuff.

It's just another option from a different perspective that may or may not fit with the way you work - but sharing ideas is always good.

:)
 
Upvote 0
My laptop is far faster than the desktop that will be remotely located. The laptop is only a couple years old and was spec'd as an engineering machine, while the tower is a much older (was still running win7) machine that was a run-of-the mill business surplus that I got 2nd hand from an uncle who runs his company's IT.

The laptop maxes out with sims; the only reason for the tower is to pull docker container workload off of my NAS that is getting overloaded on both CPU & memory. The tower should be twice as fast as my NAS. In addition to running the docker stuff, I plan to use the monitor from the tower to be an always-on display for my surveillance cams. Once it is up and running, I should rarely need to access the basement tower other than for docker maintenance or surveillance cam viewing. I'm hoping that there will be few instances where I max out the tower, and if I outgrow it I'm hoping that my uncle is upgrading computers again ;-)

I get what you are saying, but for now the extender is probably all that I need.
 
Upvote 0
Server workstation class motherboards includes as STD some IPMP or iKVM remote management capability it varies by vendiry but all offer an virtual extension to the local console either thru an management app or web navigator using an out of band Ethernet connection ASRock rack is very competitive here even sometimes it's server motherboard are cheaper than it's consumer version and includes latest AST2500 remote management solution and do not add hidden fees for this functionality (as hpe or Dell emc)

Also you can doit by software, (avoid teamviewer) look for remote desktop vnc etc
 
Upvote 0

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Similar threads

  • Question
You can only have one backup task configured in the Mac/PC Drive client. Since I’ve never done it, I can...
Replies
1
Views
460

Welcome to SynoForum.com!

SynoForum.com is an unofficial Synology forum for NAS owners and enthusiasts.

Registration is free, easy and fast!

Back
Top