User introduction Just coming across from a Centos 6 linux box to a DS920+

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User introduction Just coming across from a Centos 6 linux box to a DS920+

Hello All,
I just joined this forum and have recently purchased a DS920+ (small business with 4x2gb Raid 1) and hope to set it up soon and will appreciate any advice and support from you experienced gurus'.
Looking at a 16GB memory upgrade and not sure if it is worth it and what the best and cheapest to use ?
Also is the 960 or 970 NVME.m.2 the way to go for cache ?
I know this is an intro thread so maybe i should post questions elsewhere.... Sorry.
Regards Alex
 
Hello Alex and welcome to the forum.

I've seen you already posted a new thread about this:

I'm sure you'll get the advice soon.
 
purchased a DS920+ (small business with 4x2gb Raid 1)
Hi,

Welcome to the forum.

I assume you meant 4x2Tb disks in RAID 1.
Why RAID 1? That’s all 4 disks mirrored. Do you need that much redundancy?

Also why not try it without the cache option for awhile and see. It might not be worth it. Of course it all depends on what you’re doing and you might have your reasons. I’m just presenting a different point of view 🙂
 
Hi,

Welcome to the forum.

I assume you meant 4x2Tb disks in RAID 1.
Why RAID 1? That’s all 4 disks mirrored. Do you need that much redundancy?

Also why not try it without the cache option for awhile and see. It might not be worth it. Of course it all depends on what you’re doing and you might have your reasons. I’m just presenting a different point of view 🙂
Thanks WST16
Sorry... yes i meant TB... Ha ha wouldn't be worth having a NAS with 4x2gb :)
I was going to setup with raid 1 so I have a duplicate if one was to fail...
I will also have an offsite backup so it probably is an overkill.
Maybe I shouldn't even raid them as I do a USB backup every day.
I assume the Synology setup is saved on disk 1 so can I raid 1 to disk 1 and 2 and use 3 and 4 for straight data with no raid ?
Thanks for your help.
 
Last edited:
Maybe I shouldn't even raid them as I do a USB backup every day.
You should RAID them (and have a backup too).
With RAID 1 you’ll have a total capacity of 2TB and a fault tolerance for three drives. But it’s a waste of space.

How about RAID 5? You’ll end up with a total capacity of 6TB and a fault tolerance for one drive.

I assume the Synology setup is saved on disk 1
Don’t worry about that, it exists on all the drives in its own partition.

Check the Synology RAID calculator:
-- post merged: --

Also consider SHR instead of RAID. It’ll make it easy when the time comes to expand the storage capacity by replacing drives with bigger capacities.
 
You should RAID them (and have a backup too).
With RAID 1 you’ll have a total capacity of 2TB and a fault tolerance for three drives. But it’s a waste of space.

How about RAID 5? You’ll end up with a total capacity of 6TB and a fault tolerance for one drive.


Don’t worry about that, it exists on all the drives in its own partition.

Check the Synology RAID calculator:
-- post merged: --

Also consider SHR instead of RAID. It’ll make it easy when the time comes to expand the storage capacity by replacing drives with bigger capacities.

Thanks for that.
One question... Can i hot swap discs in the raid to take one offsite and put a blank in it's place ?
Thanks for your help.
 
Can i hot swap discs in the raid to take one offsite and put a blank in it's place ?

The very short answer is no. There are many reasons. Mainly because how RAID/SHR works.

However, keep in mind that every time you pull one of the drives out, your RAID/SHR pool will be degraded (performance wise and fault tolerance wise), and when you introduce the drive again (same or new), the DiskStation’s DSM will need to rebuild the array again, which is an intensive and time consuming operation.

For what you’re contemplating, you should have a backup on multiple drives (external USB drives) and rotate them, or even better, backup to an offsite location over the internet to another Synology DS (that you have in another home or office), or a cloud service (if you don’t mind that).

Once you receive your DS, I suggest that you play with it for a while without committing any important data. Familiarize yourself with DSM, test different configurations, install packages and test them, try backing up to externally attached storage. Break things, reset and try again. You’ll learn a lot.
See the resources section on the forum for many useful guides and ask questions (but please search the forum first).

Once ready do a fresh install and start (with a clean slate) using it as you intended.

Check this for more info on RAID/SHR.
 
The very short answer is no. There are many reasons. Mainly because how RAID/SHR works.

However, keep in mind that every time you pull one of the drives out, your RAID/SHR pool will be degraded (performance wise and fault tolerance wise), and when you introduce the drive again (same or new), the DiskStation’s DSM will need to rebuild the array again, which is an intensive and time consuming operation.

For what you’re contemplating, you should have a backup on multiple drives (external USB drives) and rotate them, or even better, backup to an offsite location over the internet to another Synology DS (that you have in another home or office), or a cloud service (if you don’t mind that).

Once you receive your DS, I suggest that you play with it for a while without committing any important data. Familiarize yourself with DSM, test different configurations, install packages and test them, try backing up to externally attached storage. Break things, reset and try again. You’ll learn a lot.
See the resources section on the forum for many useful guides and ask questions (but please search the forum first).

Once ready do a fresh install and start (with a clean slate) using it as you intended.

Check this for more info on RAID/SHR.
Thanks. you have been a wealth of information and i appreciate it.
 

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