Link Aggregation: what to consider?

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Link Aggregation: what to consider?

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I would like to bond LAN 1 and LAN 2 on my Syno DS920+ to speed up the connection and more. At the moment the NAS is connected to a switch through LAN 1.

As far I understood (please correct me if I'm wrong) I need to connected another LAN cable to the Syno e Switch and then follow this:


There is something I have to consider? Do I have to define another static IP address than the one I am using now? At the moment I have something like 192.168.1:3031

- I have defined a static IP address for LAN 1 in DSM
- I mapped the shared folder on my Mac like this: afp://192.168.1:3031
- The router defined a static IP address for the NAS
- Sometimes I need to connect via VPN when I'm not in the office

Many thanks in advance
 

Rusty

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In general, each LAN adapter will have its own IP. After the bond has been made you will configure it to any IP address you want and automatically it will take over your initial LAN1 IP address.

The idea behind LAG is to help you with concurrent access from multiple clients. It will not upgrade your speed from single client access to your nas even if that client is also on an aggregated link. It will still use a single lane inside the LAG, in this case, 1G.

There is something I have to consider?
You will need to have a switch that support LAG configuration.
 
79
3
NAS
DS920+
Operating system
  1. macOS
  2. Windows
Mobile operating system
  1. Android
  2. iOS
You will need to have a switch that support LAG configuration.
I se. There is a way to find this out? Like, in DSM do I see it when connecting the LAN 2 to the switch?
 

fredbert

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  1. RT2600ac
  2. MR2200ac
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There are two groups of LAG and which group you have access to depends on if you've enabled vSwitch (needed for Virtual Machine Manager).

  1. Without vSwitch emabled:​

    • Adaptive Load Balancing: This mode optimizes the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS whether or not the switch supports Link Aggregation. To avoid unexpected errors, please do not enable Link Aggregation on the switch even when it is supported.
    • IEEE 802.3ad Dynamic Link Aggregation: This mode optimizes the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS, and requires IEEE 802.3ad (Dynamic) Link Aggregation (LACP, 802.1AX) to be enabled on the switches. If multiple switches are used, these switches have to be stackable and properly configured.
    • Balance XOR: This mode balances the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS, and requires Static Link Aggregation to be enabled on the switches. If multiple switches are used, these switches have to be stackable and properly configured. If Link Aggregation is not supported by the switch, the traffic sent by your Synology NAS can still be balanced. With this mode, the lost links can be detected but not the cause (e.g., when the Ethernet cables are unplugged or the switch is wrongly configured).
    • Active/Standby: This mode provides your Synology NAS with network fault tolerance. That is, when the active network interface goes down, one of the other LAN ports will take over to maintain the network connection. You can choose this mode without configuring the switch or with a switch that supports IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation.

    With vSwitch enabled:​

    • Balance-SLB: This mode balances the network traffic without requiring the support for specific network switches and enables the connection between two switches.
    • Balance-TCP: This mode enables the connection with the switches configured as Dynamic Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad LACP). If multiple switches are used, they must be stackable and properly configured.
    • Active/Backup Mode: This mode provides your Synology NAS with network fault tolerance using two network interfaces. When the active network interface malfunctions, the other one will take over to maintain the network connectivity. You can choose this mode without configuring the switch.

If you have an unmanaged switch then your options are limited to either Adaptive Load Balancing or Balance-SLB. It works well and there's zero switch configuration (even if you do use a managed switch). I used to do this with with a TP-Link Easy Smart 8-port switch and my DS1520+.

If you have a managed switch that supports IEEE 802.3ad / 802.1AX then you have more options: IEEE 802.3ad Dynamic Link Aggregation and Balance-TCP. But this does require you to setup the dynamic LAG on the switch. I now use this with a TP-Link managed switch and the DS1520+.

As I've vSwitch enabled I haven't tried Balance XOR, which sounds like static LAG and may be supported by my Easy Smart switch, and I've not considered using active/backup LAG.



So what's the difference between Adaptive Load Balancing and dynamic LAG? Well that's a hard one to google but I'm leaning towards this:
  • ALB will share the links to between the connected clients but a client can't span links. So two links and three clients could have one client with a 1G connections and the other two would have up to 500M each.
  • Dynamic LAG is similar but the three clients could get a better share of the connections, up to 1G.

Probably wrong but it's where I stopped caring. My main reason to use LAG was to allow better uploads for various devices doing concurrent Time Machine and AB4B.

I've done a static LAG of two ports between the two switches and this forms the link between the RT2600ac LAN and MR2200ac backhaul.
 
79
3
NAS
DS920+
Operating system
  1. macOS
  2. Windows
Mobile operating system
  1. Android
  2. iOS
There are two groups of LAG and which group you have access to depends on if you've enabled vSwitch (needed for Virtual Machine Manager).

  1. Without vSwitch emabled:​

    • Adaptive Load Balancing: This mode optimizes the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS whether or not the switch supports Link Aggregation. To avoid unexpected errors, please do not enable Link Aggregation on the switch even when it is supported.
    • IEEE 802.3ad Dynamic Link Aggregation: This mode optimizes the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS, and requires IEEE 802.3ad (Dynamic) Link Aggregation (LACP, 802.1AX) to be enabled on the switches. If multiple switches are used, these switches have to be stackable and properly configured.
    • Balance XOR: This mode balances the network traffic received and sent by your Synology NAS, and requires Static Link Aggregation to be enabled on the switches. If multiple switches are used, these switches have to be stackable and properly configured. If Link Aggregation is not supported by the switch, the traffic sent by your Synology NAS can still be balanced. With this mode, the lost links can be detected but not the cause (e.g., when the Ethernet cables are unplugged or the switch is wrongly configured).
    • Active/Standby: This mode provides your Synology NAS with network fault tolerance. That is, when the active network interface goes down, one of the other LAN ports will take over to maintain the network connection. You can choose this mode without configuring the switch or with a switch that supports IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation.
    • With vSwitch enabled:
    • Balance-SLB: This mode balances the network traffic without requiring the support for specific network switches and enables the connection between two switches.
    • Balance-TCP: This mode enables the connection with the switches configured as Dynamic Link Aggregation (IEEE 802.3ad LACP). If multiple switches are used, they must be stackable and properly configured.
    • Active/Backup Mode: This mode provides your Synology NAS with network fault tolerance using two network interfaces. When the active network interface malfunctions, the other one will take over to maintain the network connectivity. You can choose this mode without configuring the switch.

If you have an unmanaged switch then your options are limited to either Adaptive Load Balancing or Balance-SLB. It works well and there's zero switch configuration (even if you do use a managed switch). I used to do this with with a TP-Link Easy Smart 8-port switch and my DS1520+.

If you have a managed switch that supports IEEE 802.3ad / 802.1AX then you have more options: IEEE 802.3ad Dynamic Link Aggregation and Balance-TCP. But this does require you to setup the dynamic LAG on the switch. I now use this with a TP-Link managed switch and the DS1520+.

As I've vSwitch enabled I haven't tried Balance XOR, which sounds like static LAG and may be supported by my Easy Smart switch, and I've not considered using active/backup LAG.



So what's the difference between Adaptive Load Balancing and dynamic LAG? Well that's a hard one to google but I'm leaning towards this:
  • ALB will share the links to between the connected clients but a client can't span links. So two links and three clients could have one client with a 1G connections and the other two would have up to 500M each.
  • Dynamic LAG is similar but the three clients could get a better share of the connections, up to 1G.

Probably wrong but it's where I stopped caring. My main reason to use LAG was to allow better uploads for various devices doing concurrent Time Machine and AB4B.

I've done a static LAG of two ports between the two switches and this forms the link between the RT2600ac LAN and MR2200ac backhaul.
Thanks for the detailed infos!

Do I see which option is better for my switch by simply plug in the LAN 2 into it? Or do I have to found it out on the Switch website?
 

fredbert

Moderator
NAS Support
Subscriber
1,865
760
NAS
DS1520+, DS218+, DS215j
Router
  1. RT2600ac
  2. MR2200ac
Operating system
  1. macOS
Mobile operating system
  1. iOS
If you have a basic switch then attach two ethernet cables between the NAS and two ports on the switch. Then create a bond and select whichever of ALB or Balance-SLB is offered.

The bond will be pre-configured using LAN 1's settings. When you delete the bond then AN 2 will revert to its previous network settings.
 

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