User introduction New DS920+ w/DX517 expansion owner

Currently reading
User introduction New DS920+ w/DX517 expansion owner

Wanted to say "Hi." I've had my new system for a few weeks now and still have a lot to learn. My primary use is centralized data storage for our 2 Kodi systems, for which it's performing quite well. The 920 has 4 8TB WD drives and I re-used 5 of the 6 4TB WD drives that were originally connected via usb docks to the Kodi systems (3ea.) in the 517 as a Hyper Backup Vault.

Other than storage I have also installed Docker with a Pi-Hole container which is running well. I also backup mine and my wifes laptops to the 920 via duplicity. We're a total linux environment.

Looking forward to learning as much as my old brain can handle.

Paul
 
Last edited:
I'm hoping that I've future proofed it sufficiently. :) Being retired, it will be a big source of my learning fun. I'm amazed by the capabilities of the Synology family of NAS, so much more than bulk file storage. I'm not a programmer, so I have to use guides for things like Docker, but I'm good at following instructions.
-- post merged: --

True backup is off-NAS (DX is not "off-NAS"). Just, FYI...
I'm aware, but it's close enough for my purposes. I plan to get another large drive and make a full backup to it and take it to my daughter's place. And as I'm still very much in the learning phase and I've heard this statement several times, perhaps someone could actually tell me how, on a day to day basis, my DX isn't a good backup destination. Just what scenario are you seeing that I'm not? Thanks for any clarification you can shed.
 
I get that these are essentially business level best practices, but how many home systems have even gone to the level of protection that I have implemented? Both of my entertainment centers, living rm and bedroom, are on ups with the nas connected via usb to the living room ups. Also, I have a generator that takes me about 5 mins to start and switch the isolation box over to restore power to all essential equipment.
 
I get that these are essentially business level best practices, but how many home systems have even gone to the level of protection that I have implemented? Both of my entertainment centers, living rm and bedroom, are on ups with the nas connected via usb to the living room ups. Also, I have a generator that takes me about 5 mins to start and switch the isolation box over to restore power to all essential equipment.
That doesn't protect your data and backups should your house burn down.
-- post merged: --

I plan to get another large drive and make a full backup to it and take it to my daughter's place.
Like that then at least you have a cold off-site backup. Make sure at least the disk is EXT4 format with no SHR/RAID configured, otherwise you are still device dependend. And encrypt it :)
 
True, but the odds are pretty good that that won't be happening. This place has been here since the 1880s. And, as I said, in a bit I'll be getting a separate drive to keep at my daughters place, that should take care of that possibility. :)
 
"Why is a DX expansion unit connected to the main NAS not an ideal backup destination for the NAS's data".

The reason why it's not ideal is that the NAS and expansion unit both use the same running operating system and are in effect a single appliance. Any rogue process will have access to both the main unit's storage and the expansion unit's storage. So while you have a backup of the data and that should protect against corruption/deletion on the primary storage pool, you won't be protected from a malicious actor as once they have accessed the NAS they have access to all storage.

Backing up to a second NAS provides a separation between the hardware of the primary and backup data. For your really important data you should consider secure back up off-site (e.g. a NAS at another house, and/or cloud storage).

I have a 300 MB subscription to Synology C2 that hold photos and other personal files.
 
"Why is a DX expansion unit connected to the main NAS not an ideal backup destination for the NAS's data".

The reason why it's not ideal is that the NAS and expansion unit both use the same running operating system and are in effect a single appliance. Any rogue process will have access to both the main unit's storage and the expansion unit's storage. So while you have a backup of the data and that should protect against corruption/deletion on the primary storage pool, you won't be protected from a malicious actor as once they have accessed the NAS they have access to all storage.

Backing up to a second NAS provides a separation between the hardware of the primary and backup data. For your really important data you should consider secure back up off-site (e.g. a NAS at another house, and/or cloud storage).

I have a 300 MB subscription to Synology C2 that hold photos and other personal files.
Thank you. That makes sense and I can see the potential danger. I don't really have anything but audio/video files and backups of our laptops. Nothing so important that cannot eventually be replaced. I haven't opened my lan to outside access so that should keep my attack surface to a minimum. I appreciate you taking the time to actually state what others have avoided. Overall, I feel good about my config. I've been using internet connected machines for decades and have never been attacked. Both my wife and myself are good at spotting malicious emails, too. Also, being a linux only household helps a bit.
 
Just be aware that any device on you home network that accesses the Internet can be use as an attack vector to then access hidden devices. Which is why IoT (Insecure of Things :) ) have been an issue, they access and allow access to the Internet for their features and managing them. But they not always are fully secured because that makes them harder to use.

Have you looked at the security checklist?
 
Yes, thank you, i have. I avoid IOT devices like the plaque. I'm sure there are more safeguards to be taken, but where does it end? I update all my devices daily (being retired has it's benefits) The NAS is set to auto-update, which I generally don't like, but make an exception here. Ofc, if Synology screws my system up with an auto update, I will be PO'd. :) The laptops are auto backed up daily and the NAS weekly. I'm not going to buy a cloud solution as I don't trust the cloud, not even C2. That's the main reason for the NAS in the first place, my data at my home under my control. I think once I can afford another big drive for off-site backup I'll be as good as I'm probably going to get. Being on a fixed income means I can't just buy stuff when ever, sorta have to plan ahead and save up. ;)

Thanks so much, everyone, for first the kind welcome and also all the recommends. Very helpful and reassuring in that it looks like I'm going in the right direction.

Now to further my understanding of Docker!! :)
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Welcome to SynoForum.com!

SynoForum.com is an unofficial Synology forum for NAS owners and enthusiasts.

Registration is free, easy and fast!

Back
Top