Problems connection to NAS Control Panel via ethernet

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Problems connection to NAS Control Panel via ethernet

13
1
NAS
DS216play
Operating system
  1. macOS
Mobile operating system
  1. iOS
I am new to Synology, I setup a DS216Play a while ago through my network and it worked well. Now I have moved and it is not working anymore.

I tried the usual suggestions, find.synology.com, Synology assistant etc and yesterday I bought an ethernet cable to connect my MacBook directly to the NAS.

I now can connect to the folders on the NAS but I still can not connect to the Control Panel.

The new internet access is not my router so I can not physically attach a cable to that, I did a reset to reset the ip as well. No avail.

How shall I proceed? Any help is very much appreciated. Thank you
 
By sheer accident I tried to use http://synologynas.local:5000 again (this time with the ethernet cable attached) and I got into the control panel.

I am still puzzled however how to setup the NAS to use the internet but not being able to physically plug into the internet router or being able to access the settings of the internet router. At the moment I am only able to access the NAS via ethernet cable but would love to use it also through the iPhone and SmartTV also when I am away from home.
 
At the moment I am only able to access the NAS via ethernet cable but would love to use it also through the iPhone and SmartTV also when I am away from home.
Welcome to the forum!

Let's take a step back. Local access vs Internet access is not the same and it takes certain configuration to make it work.

So, 1st, is the NAS configured inside LAN (Control Panel > Network) to use a static IP addess (that would be the local one) or DHCP? In any case, make sur eto lock it down on a static IP address inside the same network (subnet) as your local devices so that it doesn't travel around the network.

Regarding Internet access there are several ways to do it. Easiest would be to use Quickconnect (Control Panel > External access > Quickconnect), as it will not require any other network management from your end in terms of router settings like port forward. Considering you have limited access to the router it would be the best way forward.

Another method is using DDNS service (same location in control panel, just a different tab), but that will require access to the router and some more configuration.
 
Thank you. I have set the NAS to use a static IP address... see screenshot:
Screenshot 2023-01-16 at 3.49.14 pm.png

The subnet mask says 255.255.0.0 here however the subnet mask for the Router that accesses the internet is 255.255.255.0 and the IP range is between 192.168.1.1 being the router to 192.168.1.xx.

Do I have to set my static IP address for the NAS on this as well and choose my own static IP address?
 
Do I have to set my static IP address for the NAS on this as well and choose my own static IP address?
Correct. This is the main issue.

Set it for example like 192.168.1.xy when XY is any number from 2 to 254. Subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 and Gateway is the IP of the router 192.168.1.1. DNS can be the same address as the router, or any other public DNS like 1.1.1.1.
 
Great, I have done that and have disconnected the cable to see if it shows up on the WIFI.

Shouldn't have done that, I could not see anything anymore, so I plugged the cable in again. Then I realised that the cable is on a different sub mask so I changed the network settings on the MacBook (cable attached again) to the following but still now luck:
Screenshot 2023-01-16 at 5.24.40 pm.png

Screenshot 2023-01-16 at 5.24.23 pm.png
 
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I'm trying to understand exactly what you have done. It sounds that you have used a cable to connect the NAS directly to your Mac's Ethernet port and, unless you have another Ethernet port on the Mac, it is using WiFi to connect to your local network and out to the Internet.

If this is true and the Mac still can access the Internet that would mean your network interface priority is:
  1. Ethernet
  2. WiFi
When you connected the Mac directly to the NAS they should have automatically negotiated IP addresses so that the two devices can communicate. This is my new Mac Mini M1 connected via Thunderbolt to my old Mac Mini 2012.
1673862285721.png


The 169.254.x.y subnet is being used by both devices to automatically assign IP addresses. My MM 2012 doesn't have direct Internet access but, for now, I have enabled Internet Sharing on the MM M1 so that it shares its Ethernet connection on the LAN with the MM 2012: the MM 2012 is hidden (NAT) behind the MM M1's LAN IP.

I see on your screen shots that you are doing manual configuration. Maybe you should use automatic configuration for now, as this will enable the NAS to request an IP address on whatever LAN you connect it to. You say something about your router but I don't understand what you mean: all the NAS needs is a wired connection to the LAN, and somehow the LAN has a default gateway that you use to direct traffic to the Internet.
 
ll the NAS needs is a wired connection to the LAN, and somehow the LAN has a default gateway that you use to direct traffic to the Internet.
As @fredbert said, I thought you will connect both your mac and nas to the network not together directly.
 
Last edited:
There's a whole bundle of confusion in all of the posts above. Let's see if we can straighten it out:

Let's assume for the purposes of this review that you have just three devices on your network:

1. Router: provides access to internet and probably has both a number of ethernet ports and broadcasts a WiFi network.

2. Computer: Mac, Windows, or Linux. All access the network, and thence the internet, in essentially the same way, using either ethernet or WiFi connections.

3. Synology NAS box. Connected to the network using an ethernet cable.

The simplest way to set up the physical connections is to have an ethernet cable from both the computer and the Synology box to the router. You can optionally use a WiFi connection from the computer but with a server it is generally best to use a wired (ethernet) connection. Do not connect the computer and the server directly to each other - they must go through the router if you want them to have access to the internet.

Having physically connected the devices you need to configure them to be able to talk to each other.

This essentially requires that they all need to have unique IP addresses that are within the same subnet, that is an address that has the first three numbers the same (such as 192.168.1.x). The last number, indicated by the x, is a unique number for each device on the network which must be between 1 and 254.

You can either configure this setting manually, or connected devices can be set automatically by the router using the DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) server which is a fundamental element within it. The DHCP will give all connected computers which are set to use DHCP an address and other settings which are compatible with the subnet.

Just to cover the other aspects of the configuration, or if you want to take more control over the settings:

Router: self-explanatory - this is the IP address of the router. Another term for it is gateway, as it is the gateway to the internet.

Subnet Mask - this determines whether the computer can only talk to that subnet or can also talk to other subnets, but to avoid complexity (and because it is plenty for most domestic networks), it is best to use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 which is correct for all devices where the first three numbers of the IP address are the same. This enables them to talk to each other, provides for up to 254 devices on the subnet, and means that any attempts to connect to a device with an IP address which does not have the first three numbers the same will go out through the gateway to the internet.

DNS server - this is the device which converts an alphabetical address (such as www.news.com) into an IP address (such as 123.123.123.123) which is the actual address used to communicate between devices on the network. This can be simply set to the same address as the router, which acts as a DNS server for the network. It buffers any DNS requests that are for destinations outside the local network, using an external DNS server to resolve them into their IP address on the internet.

Note that you can have both devices that are set up manually and devices that are set up by DHCP on the local network, as long as they don't end up with the same IP Address.

One quick thing to mention is that one of the devices above seems to have an IP address of 169.254.33.138. This is a special kind of address called a "self-assigned" address. The device which has this address has given itself this address because it cannot get an address any other way. It has not been able to connect to a DHCP server and in addition no-one has set it up manually.

Unfortunately a self-assigned address is pretty useless and will only work with other devices which have similar self-assigned addresses with the first two numbers the same. In most cases it is simply a warning sign that your network is not set up correctly.

I hope the above helps. It is a big subject and this is just a precis of the most important aspects of it.
 
Hello @Rusty and @fredbert

Thank you for your explanations. I was away for a couple of days as we had a fire going through here. Hence the pause.

Setup here:

  • Router that accesses the internet (can not touch it, it is not mine)
  • iMac
  • Synology NAS

What I have done...

  • I reset the network setup on the NAS pressing the RESET button or 3 seconds.
  • I connected the NAS to the iMac via Ethernet cable.
  • I immediately can see the NAS as a mounted drive
Screenshot 2023-01-21 at 4.27.31 pm.png

  • I accessed the NAS Control Panel using http://synologynas.local:5000
  • Under NETWORK => NETWORK INTERFACE I edited the LAN connection and applied a static IP address:

Screenshot 2023-01-21 at 4.30.09 pm.png

- Now it seems that the NAS is showing up in the Network on the iMac
Screenshot 2023-01-21 at 4.31.23 pm.png

- Checking the System Network Settings of the iMac for the Ethernet cable shows
Screenshot 2023-01-21 at 4.32.36 pm.png


So far so good, at least I can access the files on the NAS via the iMac.

What I want to achieve

  • Access the NAS locally with my iMac, iPhone and SmartTV as I am using EMBY as my media server extensively.
  • I somehow possible accessing the NAS through the internet when I am away from home.

Does this make now more sense? Thank you for all your help. It is appreciated.
 
Does this make now more sense? Thank you for all your help. It is appreciated.
It does but you only have to connect both of them to the router, that's it. The NAS is sorted now in terms of the static ip address. Just connect it to the router, not the Mac. Then, do the same thing with the Mac, and connect it to the router.

As you can see in the image of the iMac network it is getting an APIPA address because the NAS is not allocating any addresses via DHCP, that is the task of the router at this point.

So again, just connect both devices to the router 1st.

If the NAS after that will not be visible inside the Finder sidebar, use the Finder "connect to server" option (CMD +K) to enter the following smb://192.168.1.128 as the NAS address, and try and connect. You should get a prompt to enter your credentials (DSM one), and all shared folders should be presented.
 
Thanks Rusty, the problem is that I do not have permission to physically access the internet router. So I can not connect a cable???
 
Well, that's a bit of a problem. Sorry I completely missed that in your original post. So guessing iMac is connected via wifi to it?

In that case, you will only be able to connect NAS to the iMac directly in order to get to the data. So if that method already works, the only thing that you need now is Internet access for your NAS.

Can you confirm that in this current setup (NAS being connected to your mac) that you have Internet access on the DSM side?
 
Well, that's a bit of a problem. Sorry I completely missed that in your original post. So guessing iMac is connected via wifi to it?

In that case, you will only be able to connect NAS to the iMac directly in order to get to the data. So if that method already works, the only thing that you need now is Internet access for your NAS.

Can you confirm that in this current setup (NAS being connected to your mac) that you have Internet access on the DSM side?
Yes, that is exactly the situation. iMac has access to the internet via WiFi. The NAS is connected to the iMac via ethernet cable.

Wishing to also connect to the NAS at home via WIFI with iPhone, MacBook and Smart TV to access intensive education video library via Emby.
-- post merged: --

I am not sure if I have access via DSM side, how do I check?
 
how do I check?
Open up Package Center, do the apps load up? Or open up Control Panel and go to Update and restore. Does the update check work?

Wishing to also connect to the NAS at home via WIFI with iPhone, MacBook and Smart TV
Well, you do know its local IP address, so now you can use apps for those devices and enter the IP address of the NAS in order to connect to it.
 
Open up Package Center, do the apps load up? Or open up Control Panel and go to Update and restore. Does the update check work?


Well, you do know its local IP address, so now you can use apps for those devices and enter the IP address of the NAS in order to connect to it.
Checking failed ... no internet connection it says.

Using 192.168.1.128 (ip address of NAS) on iPhone Safari browser does not connect either
 
Checking failed ... no internet connection it says.

Using 192.168.1.128 (ip address of NAS) on iPhone Safari browser does not connect either
Ok try and change the gateway parameter in the Network adapter settings (image above) to your current Mac's wifi IP address. Also, change the DNS settings to say 1.1.1.1.

All in all, this will not be ideal. Bottom line, you will be able to access your NAS via your mac but probably not from any other device considering that the NAS itself is an island with no connection to the rest of the network.
 
hmm, well not ideal indeed. I had a quick flash ... I have an old Timecapsule, somehow I remember it was said it can be configured in different ways, so maybe do you think I could hook up the NAS to it and it will be seen on the network? Not that I have a great idea about network setups.
 

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