Info Second Generation of Ubiquiti UniFi Switching announcement

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Info Second Generation of Ubiquiti UniFi Switching announcement

NAS
1811+, 3x 1813+, 718+, 214play ... multisite Ubiquiti Unifi networks (USG-Pro,PoE,NanoHD)
Operating system
Linux, Windows
Mobile operating system
Android, iOS
you can read more here , include POE++ support

12837693-C8BD-457C-BD6A-DCF1B31923BE.jpeg
 
NAS
1811+, 3x 1813+, 718+, 214play ... multisite Ubiquiti Unifi networks (USG-Pro,PoE,NanoHD)
Operating system
Linux, Windows
Mobile operating system
Android, iOS
Here is a short intro about POE standards, when you are not sure what means what

PoE
  • Also known as: PoE, 2-pair PoE
  • Related standard: IEEE 802.3af
  • Maximum power to port: 15.4W
PoE Type 1 utilizes two pairs to connect many types of lower-powered devices to the network. Based on the initial IEEE 802.3af-2003 standard, it provides up to 15.4W of DC power to each PoE port (up to 12.95W of power for each device). PoE Type 1 can support devices such as VoIP phones, sensors/meters, wireless access points with two antennas and simple, static surveillance cameras that don’t pan, tilt or zoom.

PoE+
  • Also known as: PoE+, PoE Plus
  • Related standard: IEEE 802.3at
  • Maximum power to port: 30W
Higher-powered devices are connected to the network using PoE Type 2, based on the IEEE 802.3at-2009 standard. It is backward compatible (meaning that it can also support the types of devices typically supported by PoE Type 1), and provides 30W of DC power to each PoE port (up to 25.5W of power for each device). PoE Type 2 can support devices such as more complex surveillance cameras that pan, tilt or zoom, as well as wireless access points with six antennas, LCD displays, biometric sensors and tablets.

PoE++
  • Also known as: 4-pair PoE, 4P PoE, PoE++, UPOE
  • Related standard: IEEE 802.3bt
  • Maximum power to port: 60W
PoE Type 3 uses all four pairs in a copper cable. Currently in development with IEEE 802.3bt Type 3 Work Group. It provides 60W of DC power to each PoE port (up to 51W of power for each device). PoE Type 3 can support devices such as videoconferencing system components and building management devices.

Higher power PoE
  • Related standard: IEEE 802.3bt
  • Maximum power to port: 100W
Growing power requirements of network devices are pushing the need for higher power delivered through network cabling – which is where PoE Type 4 comes into play. It provides up to 100W of DC power to each PoE port (up to 71W of power for each device). PoE Type 4 can support devices such as laptops and TVs.

Conclusion:
Frequently (as we can read in this forum also) is misunderstanding of this standards reason of - my device doesn’t work.
 

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