NAS Compares Synology NAS – SATA vs NVMe SSD Caching Test

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NAS Compares Synology NAS – SATA vs NVMe SSD Caching Test

Synology NAS SSD Caching – Is There a Difference Between NVMe and SATA SSD Use

If you have purchased a Synology NAS in the last 2-3 years in the ‘PLUS’ series of devices (eg. DS920+, DS1019+, DS720+, DS918+, RS1619XS+, etc) then chances are one of the reasons that you considered it was because of the great level of future-proofing it arrived with featured inside. From Upgradable memory to expandable storage later in the device’s lifespan, there are a few ways in which you can ensure that the device has its performance kept high several years after it’s first deployment. However, one of the more unique and (at least until recently) Synology-Only ways that you have available is the use of twin dedicated NVMe SSD bays. This is the feature that allows you to introduce high-speed PCIe bandwidth SSDs that leverage the performance and IOPs increases available to solid-state drives and supply them for use to your larger and slower (although much more affordable) Hard Drive RAID storage pool and increase performance with the use of caching – all whilst not taking up any of the regular storage bays in your 2, 4, 6 or 8-Bay Storage device. As good as that sounds (and generally is, when setup and used correctly), NVMe SSDs a noticeable degree more expensive than traditional SATA SSDs and many wonder if the Synology NAS system is actually taking advantage of the increased speed/performance of NVMes over SATA SSDs at all. With traditional SATA 2.5″ and M.2 SATA SSDs arriving at typically reported speeds by manufacturers of 450-550MB/s Read/Write, whilst NVMe SSDs reporting anywhere from 1800-5000MB/s performance (very much dependant on the PCIe and NAND used) that is a HUGE difference in performance potential and you want to KNOW that you are getting some/all of that benefit. So, today I want to share some brief testing I did on comparing SATA SSD vs NVMe SSD caching in a new Synology DS920+. These tests form part 1 of a series of tests I am working on, alongside tests using the new Synology E10M20-T1 and M2D20 upgrade cards (coming soon) and should be used as guidance only and not a clear proof of anything widely conclusive. But nevertheless, I think they are interesting to examine.

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