Unable to Create Multiple Volumes on DS1621+ with SHR Raid

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Unable to Create Multiple Volumes on DS1621+ with SHR Raid

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Synology DS1621+
Hello,
I have a new DS1621+ with four 12TB Seagate IronWolf Pro HD's.
I have created a storage pool with RAID SHR and a total capacity of 32.7TB and would like two separate volumes, one with 15TB and the 2nd volume with 17TB.

When I select create new volume from the create tab, I get a popup" No available storage pools for creating a new volume"

What did I miss? is it possible the HD's are not compatabile?
 
By chance did you already create a volume... one which uses the entire storage pool?
Hi Telos:

Yes i did, I then tested it by removing the pool and volume and starting over and only selecting two of the 4 drives. I was then able to create 2 separate pools and 2 volumes this way.
However it seems doing it this way I loose quite a bit of available HD storage space.

The end goal is to create 1 share that is for data archive and the other is for server backups.

I possibly could be going about this all wrong.
I'm starting to think of scrapping the original idea and doing 1 LUN/iSCSI connection for the archived data.
Then leaving a pool or volume available for Active Backup for Business. Possibly I can use this tool for full server backups?

Thanks for any help or suggestions.
I am new to the Synology.
 
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Please don't go with iSCSI unless you are familiar with that protocol and it's limitations. SMB for windows or other protocols for MAC/Linux would be better in most cases.
 
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If you have btrfs formatting...
So if I setup the shared folder, can I use a portion of the entire pool storage and volume to use Active Backup for Business for the servers and then the other portion I can use to move data in and out for a file archive? If so how do you recommend I use the file archive on the users computers rather then iSCSI?

Thanks again.
 
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how do you recommend I use the file archive on the users computers rather then iSCSI?
The general practice is to enable home service, which creates a folder structure for which each user account can store "private" content (users belonging to the administrator group, have no restrictions to all "home" folders).

How do I enable the user home service?

If groups need to share content, create a shared folder (ex., projectA, projectB, ...) .

Does that answer your question?
 
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The general practice is to enable home service, which creates a folder structure for which each user account can store "private" content (users belonging to the administrator group, have no restrictions to all "home" folders).

How do I enable the user home service?

If groups need to share content, create a shared folder (ex., projectA, projectB, ...) .

Does that answer your question?
I should have given more information to what I was trying to accomplish, I apologize.
One or two users will access the NAS to manually move/archive data from a file server to the NAS.
The other part of the NAS will be used strictly as an automated process to backup servers.

With that information, what do you recommend as being the best way to provision the NAS?
 
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In that case, home service offers no advantage.
So rather then using iSCSI for the archive data what if I setup a shared folder?
Is there a benefit to doing it this way?
Then the rest of the remaining pool I would leave for the Active Backup for Business to run the automated backups?

For the Active Backup for Business do I need to have a volume setup for this?
 
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Last edited by a moderator:
I should have given more information to what I was trying to accomplish, I apologize.
One or two users will access the NAS to manually move/archive data from a file server to the NAS.
The other part of the NAS will be used strictly as an automated process to backup servers.

With that information, what do you recommend as being the best way to provision the NAS?
There seems to be some confusion over some of the technical aspects involved here. As a quick & dirty summary, if I may:

  • Storage Pools are about RAID levels. If you need more than one type of RAID level - say, a RAID 5 type array for main data and a single non-RAID drive as a scratch drive, you would achieve this by creating one Storage Pool for each RAID type. If having everything on a single RAID/SHR type suits, then stick to a single SP.
  • Volumes are about filesystems. Your NAS can format volumes using either EXT4 or BTRFS fs. You can read up on the pros/cons of each; but if everything is good on BTRFS and you have no technical reason to need both fs in play, then create a single BTRFS Volume on your single SP using all the space.
  • Shares are about data organisation and structure, and things like quotas are applied here. This is where you should implement your split between Archive and machine Backups. Create a Share for each, along with whatever user access permissions are appropriate, and whatever quotas you want to specify to divide up the volume space.
In general, it pays to Keep It Simple: so 1 SP, 1 Volume and however many shares you need to create the data structure you're after in 95% of the cases that a Syno is likely to be used in.

- iSCSI vs NFS vs SMB/CIFS: these are the 3 ways your client machines can connect to the Shares you create. Ordinarily, if you are dealing with shunting files and folders around the network and between machines, and want more than 1 user to be able to do this at the same time, you want to use either NFS (if unix/linux clients) or SMB/CIFS (Windows/MacOS/Linux clients). SMB presents remote files and folders on the NAS to your clients as regular files & folders that can be manipulated via File Mgr / Finder / Nautilus etc.
iSCSI is a block level protocol that presents the remote NAS share as a Hard Drive that needs to be formatted by the connecting client, and which presents itself as a local HDD on that client. iSCSI connections are usually exlusive to that connected client, ie you cant have multiple client machines all connected to the same iSCSI share simultaneously.

Unless you have a particular specific technical need to do this via iSCSI, you would be best served creating a regular SMB (NFS if linux) share and connecting client(s) using that. Note that the same share can have both NFS and SMB connections created to it if you have a mixed OS shop.

hth
 
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There seems to be some confusion over some of the technical aspects involved here. As a quick & dirty summary, if I may:

  • Storage Pools are about RAID levels. If you need more than one type of RAID level - say, a RAID 5 type array for main data and a single non-RAID drive as a scratch drive, you would achieve this by creating one Storage Pool for each RAID type. If having everything on a single RAID/SHR type suits, then stick to a single SP.
  • Volumes are about filesystems. Your NAS can format volumes using either EXT4 or BTRFS fs. You can read up on the pros/cons of each; but if everything is good on BTRFS and you have no technical reason to need both fs in play, then create a single BTRFS Volume on your single SP using all the space.
  • Shares are about data organisation and structure, and things like quotas are applied here. This is where you should implement your split between Archive and machine Backups. Create a Share for each, along with whatever user access permissions are appropriate, and whatever quotas you want to specify to divide up the volume space.
In general, it pays to Keep It Simple: so 1 SP, 1 Volume and however many shares you need to create the data structure you're after in 95% of the cases that a Syno is likely to be used in.

- iSCSI vs NFS vs SMB/CIFS: these are the 3 ways your client machines can connect to the Shares you create. Ordinarily, if you are dealing with shunting files and folders around the network and between machines, and want more than 1 user to be able to do this at the same time, you want to use either NFS (if unix/linux clients) or SMB/CIFS (Windows/MacOS/Linux clients). SMB presents remote files and folders on the NAS to your clients as regular files & folders that can be manipulated via File Mgr / Finder / Nautilus etc.
iSCSI is a block level protocol that presents the remote NAS share as a Hard Drive that needs to be formatted by the connecting client, and which presents itself as a local HDD on that client. iSCSI connections are usually exlusive to that connected client, ie you cant have multiple client machines all connected to the same iSCSI share simultaneously.

Unless you have a particular specific technical need to do this via iSCSI, you would be best served creating a regular SMB (NFS if linux) share and connecting client(s) using that. Note that the same share can have both NFS and SMB connections created to it if you have a mixed OS shop.

hth
Thanks FLortan for the great explanation!

I think using the 1 pool and 1 volume with shared drives would be the best and then creating the two shared drives.
I created one new shared folder "archive" and set the quota to 15TB. (total storage space is 31TB)
The active backup will use the remaining free space.
I was unable to find how to add the storage quota to the Active Backup for Business share drive that was automatically created when I downloaded the application to the NAS.

Did I miss a step in the active backup for business folder creation?
 
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Last edited:
I was unable to find how to add the storage quota to the Active Backup for Business share drive
The Knowledge Center and your Help file has quite a lot of information... For example...
H8taIpz.png


Just realize when you do this, that ABB will silently "break" when capacity is unavailable. I wouldn't personally set a hard limit with a backup system. But that's me 😎
 
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I was unable to find how to add the storage quota to the Active Backup for Business share drive that was automatically created when I downloaded the application to the NAS.

Did I miss a step in the active backup for business folder creation?
I'll let others chime in on this as I dont use ABB myself.
 
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The Knowledge Base and your Help file has quite a lot of information... For example...
H8taIpz.png


Just realize when you do this, that ABB will silently "break" when capacity is unavailable. I wouldn't personally set a hard limit with a backup system. But that's me 😎
oh wow. thanks for this info. So If i leave the ABB with no folder quota it should be fine and just overwrite the old data when its reached and not break or stop functioning?
Also will it start eating into the archive Data? I would like to set aside a total of 15TB of archive data that is available.
My concern would be that the backup will fill up the archive to fast and then we will not be able to add more to the archive when needed.

THanks for all this info btw!
 
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So If i leave the ABB with no folder quota it should be fine and just overwrite the old data when its reached and not break or stop functioning?
Also will it start eating into the archive Data?
No, No and No…. Left to itself, ABB will consume data space until there is none. You must create a retention policy that meets your needs, and provide the storage capacity to meet your retention policy. Knowledge Center
 
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